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ISTE 2017: Our 9 Year Old Girl, EdTech Reporter, Talks With Girls Who Code

aplazer-iste-720 ISTE 2017: Our 9 Year Old Girl, EdTech Reporter, Talks With Girls Who CodeISTE 17: Girls Who Code Is Creating A Workforce Of Strong Women Engineers and Developers

girlswhocode-top ISTE 2017: Our 9 Year Old Girl, EdTech Reporter, Talks With Girls Who Code

Girls Who Code is a non-profit that already touches 40,000 girls and young women. They are preparing girls for the future of work because there is a huge gender divide in most STEM/STEAM careers. Especially software development. Coding is one of the biggest opportunities in the work force today, and for some reason it’s also one of the industries with the fewest amount of women.

Where gender gaps in a lot of industries have improved over the last 35 years, it’s actually worsened in computing since the 1980s. In 1984 37% of all computer science graduates were women. Today that number is just 18%. By 2020 there will be 1.4 million jobs available in computing related fields. US graduates are on track to fill 29% of those position. Women are on track to fill just 3%.

Those are alarming statistics. Girls Who Code is one of the organizations leading the charge to help ignite the future generation of women computer scientists, developers and even entrepreneurs.

bloxles2-e1498446454335 ISTE 2017: Our 9 Year Old Girl, EdTech Reporter, Talks With Girls Who CodeWhat started out as just 20 girls in New York City has grown to 40,000 girls across the country. That’s the same number of girls who graduate with computer science degrees each year. Girls Who Code alumni have gone onto create cashflow positive apps and even taken on internships at companies like Facebook. Speaking of corporate America, 60 major corporations have pledged to hire alumni of Girls Who Code.

Girls Who Code is playing a big role at ISTE 17. GWC founder Reshma Saujani is the closing keynote speaker at ISTE this year.

When we passed by the Girls Who Code booth our 9 year old edtech reporter, who herself is a girl, wanted to know what they did. So she asked. Like many kids in grades K-5 she has had some light experience coding in block languages, using things like Bitsbox, Bloxels, and Dash and Dot.  Girls Who Code is a natural progression for any girl who has had that kind of exposure, and even if they haven’t but they’ve always been interested in computers, app development and innovation, there’s a spot in a GWC for them.

Check out our video interview below and find out how to start your own Girls Who Code club at girlwshocode.com

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